JUL
27
0

Judas Fish, Summer Mayflies, & RIO Products

What is a Judas Fish?

This article comes to us from MidCurrent. We had not heard of a Judas Fish before and it's quite interesting how it got the name and how the National Park Service is using it. We think you'll enjoy the story.

http://discovermagazine.com/2016/oct/the-judas-fish

Summer Mayflies: Slate Drakes

Here on Fishing Creek, and in most of the northeast, we are having one of the wettest summers in recent history. Actually just yesterday we had a flash flood in our valley which surprised everyone. Usually by this time in July we're hoping for rain – not so this year.

The good water levels mean that summer fishing will continue to be good and it's time to think about our summer mayflies and in particular the slate drakes. The slate drakes on Fishing Creek are pretty much a true size 12, and a comparadun imitates the actual insect very well, and that's why it's in our online store. The red brown spinner in a size 12 is a pretty good slate drake spinner imitation. The flies have been hatching for awhile, but the fish are still hungry and eager for them.Dark Green Drakes Fly Fisherman

Here's a link to an interesting “Drake” article by Pennsylvanian Paul Weamer. If you live or fish on the east coast, and haven't fished any of the “Drakes,” this is a good year and a good time to try it. They're big, fish love them, and they provide lots of fun at a time of year when otherwise we'd be fishing the really little stuff!

http://www.flyfisherman.com/how-to/match-the-hatch/matching-the-drake-hatch/

WINNER WINNER!

We are delighted to announce that RIO made a clean sweep of every single possible new product award. Read more here
http://mailchi.mp/rioproducts/winner-winner?e=8b5f86f70f  

 

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1897 Hits
MAR
17
0

Some fishing tips from Cathy

Thoughts on Fishing

patagoniaThis is my view as I sit here alongside the road on a warm late summer afternoon in Patagonia. Miles and miles of open space. The only thing I hear is the light wind and an occasional bird. It's lovely. I fished the first half of the day, caught a bunch of rainbows from 8 to 16 inches and a couple of larger Browns. Barry, our guide Nico, and I had lunch, and now I am taking little time off to write this blog. As much as I love this wild place, I find myself looking forward to getting home to spring and the opening of our trout season.

I have had the opportunity in our line of work to fish with a lot great fishermen. All of these men are very good at what they do -- and over the years I have gotten some sound advice from them. This week I would like to share some of their thoughts.

1. Fish where the fish are. This came from the late Jack Gartside. What he is saying is don't waste your time in unproductive water. Learn to read the water and know where the fish should be holding and concentrate your fishing time in those areas.

 2. The line will go where the rod tip leads it. Lefty Kreh has told me this over and over. You may have read it in his books too. Lefty is saying that, if you have sufficient line speed, the fly will go wherever the rod tip is pointed at the end of the speed-up-and-stop (at the end) of the cast. So, point your rod tip where you want the fly to land.

3. If your leader won't turn over at the end of the cast, don't shoot line on the last false cast. I don't remember who told me this, but I think of it often when I am trying to turn over a cast with a big fly, especially into the wind. Get your line speed and distance with your first two or three false casts and present the cast to the water on the final false cast without shooting line. You'll be surprised at how well this works.

4. If your beetle (or any big foam bug) lands upside down, just strip it. Again, I don't remember who taught me this, but I was re-casting whenever my big beetle landed upside down. With one strip, it rights itself, and often gets the attention of the fish.

5. Very few fish are caught on poor casts. Again, Jack Gartside. I heard him say this in a casting demonstration. He is saying to make every cast count. Put it where it should be and fish it with confidence.

6. Get your extra power from the haul, not from the rod tip. Brian O'Keefe was helping me get ready for a Best-of-the-West competition many years ago and I kept tailing the loop on my final cast. I was "hitting" the rod tip much too hard, shocking it, and getting very frustrated. I share this advice with my double-haul students. It works every time.

7. If you can't see your dry fly, re-cast or change it. How many times do we stare into the water trying to find our fly? In the meantime, it is floating along unattended and if a fish does take it, we may never see it. Don't take the chance, change flies or positions to alter the glare, or whatever is necessary to keep your eye on the fly.

8. Adjust your strike indicator when the depth changes. This comes from Barry. He is always doing this. It's very easy to tell yourself that the indicator is okay where it is, but the fish don't see it that way. If the water gets deeper, we must slide the indicator further back on the leader to allow the fly to go deeper. Otherwise the fly will be above the fish as it drifts through the water and they won't take it. If the water gets shallow, the indicator needs to be adjusted again, further down on the leader, or the fly will snag on the bottom, or if a fish takes the fly we may be too late with the strike and will miss the fish.

9. Keep your fly lines clean. Something I've learned over the years. If your fly line is not clean, it won't shoot well, float well, or last long. If you notice your floating line is sinking or feels "sticky" on the rod, doesn't shoot well, clean it. Use a good cleaner from a reputable line or tackle company. If you're fishing a RIO line, use RIO's line cleaner. Clean it at home or in the grass before you go fishing. You'll be surprised at the difference a clean line will make.

10. Keep your fly in the water. Simple, yes? Not always. When the fishing is slow, it's easy to think about how tired you are and soon you decide that you'll just reel in and enjoy the boat ride down the river, or take a little nap by the side of the stream. Sure, there are times when the fishing is more productive than others, but you won't catch any fish with your fly in the hook keeper! Never Ever.

Want to see more tips from time to time? Let us know and we'll keep them coming. Thanks for reading our blog. Cathy

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FEB
12
0

The Becks are in New Zealand

Riverview Lodge, New Zealand

Cathy sent us some photos from Riverview Lodge in New Zealand where they have been for almost a week. The weather is warm, bright and sunny almost continuously and the fishing has been some of the best ever. Lots of big fish (7 pounds and up) caught on big dry flies — cicadas and beetles, along with some nymphs. The biggest so far? 10 pounds, 2 of them! Fresh strawberries from the garden and sight fishing to big browns. Does it get any better?

nz collage

Great RIO Product!

Picture this - the South Island of New Zealand, what we call the Everest of trout fishing, we're on the Hope River with our friend and guide, John Gemmell. We've just finished landing our third trout from one pool. The largest was 10.5 pounds, followed by an acrobatic 9 pound fish, and finally a smaller 7.5 fish. All were landed on the new RIO 4X BECK IMAGE 0662Powerflex Plus tippet material. This stuff is absolutely amazing. John said in all of his years of guiding he's never seen
anything this thin or this strong. We agree. If staying connected to the trout of a lifetime matters to you, you owe it to yourself to try RIO Powerflex Plus

 

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2989 Hits
MAR
03
0

Report from the Field- From Cathy at Tres Valles Argentina

What a way to start the trip!!

Nico

 

Nico Fliess hooks and lands a record brown trout from the lake at Tres Valles. 


The monster brown measured 33" length, 16 pounds, and was perfect in every way.  The three of us were fishing this morning hoping for a nice fish to photograph when Nico landed this fish on RIO 3x tippet, his 590-4 Sage ONE rod and RIO Grand line, fishing a #12 caddis pupa.  His reaction was, "I am so happy", which was repeated many times, followed by

"I've never seen a brown trout this big", and added as an after thought, "I love my Sage ONE."   It was the best morning we've ever had on the lake with 12 fish landed, none under 6 pounds!  We love this place!

Nico1

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3475 Hits
JAN
15
0

Cathy's Report from the Field

We're having an interesting week here at Coyhaique River Lodge in Chile. Our first day was rainy, chilly, and windy and we all suffered through it and hoped for better weather ahead. And we got it - As it turned out the first day was our worst day and now we are more than half way through an absolutely beautiful week of weather, guides, and fishing. Our group chile1is fishing an interesting combination of rivers, spring creeks, and lakes.  We've seen winds gusting up to 40 mph (first day), beautiful mayfly hatches, big rainbows on the lakes, and lots of fish landed. After the first day, the weather straightened out and we've had lots of sunshine and moderating breezes. The dry fly fishing has been very good using a lot of parachute Adams and today we caught a number of big fish on Super Buggers on the lake. It's been a perfect week for the Sage Method and ONE rods throwing foam flies. We've put both to work evchile2eryday. It's nice to have a rod that steps right up to the plate when a little more backbone is called for in these Patagonia breezes! On one lake we found big rainbows cruising just under the surface and had a lot of fun casting big beetles to them. The take was very slow and gentle, but immediately upon being hooked they would explode and take off across the lake. Great fun. Actually our guide, Gaston, asked what line we had on the ONE. It was the RIO Perception, a beautiful line on either rod. In addition to the interesting fishing, Coyhaique River Lodge is new, spacious, and comfortable with an excellent staff and amazing guides. I suspect this will be a week we won't soon forget and we'll look forward to coming back.

Thinking of new destinations, we're working on two new trips for 2016, Ireland and the Seychelles. Our itinerary for Ireland will include several castle stays with private trout/salmon fishing at each. This will be much more than a fishing trip, we'll tour the castles, enjoy the accommodations, and take advantage of the fishing. Timing will be summer. Details will be forthcoming. Please let us know if you're interested. It won't be a big group.

It's been at least ten years since our last visit to the Seychelles and it's way past time for a reunion. We loved the amazing fishing and accommodations on our first trip and we don't know why we've waited so long to go back. If you've thought about Giant Trevally and the Seychelles, we'd love to have you join us. Planning is still in the very early stages, but if you've an interest in the Seychelles, please let us know and we'll keep you posted as we finalize plans. It's bound to be an exciting destination.2262 ARGENTINA DEC 2013

We also have one room still available (1 or 2 people), at Tres Valles, Argentina for March 1-8, 2015.  It's a great destination and a great time of year to be there.  Trout fishing in the Andes, beautiful scenery and lots of fish.  Give our office a call at 877-278-5638 if you'd like more information.  

We'll talk more next week.

Cathy

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3106 Hits
OCT
21
0

Paying Homage to the Bighorn

2013 4106BIGHORN RIVER

 

 

 

Barry wrote an interesting blog about his take on the Bighorn River.  The article recently appeared on RIO's website and I wanted to highlight it here so you all didn't miss it.  Click here to be directed to the RIO Blog.

 

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2893 Hits
JUL
24
0

Sage & RIO take home the trophies - Again!

sageThe annual IFTD (International Fly Tackle Dealer) Show was held in Orlando, FL, last week. We're proud to announce that once again Sage and RIO won Best of Show for new 2015 products. We don't know how Jerry Siem continues to improve on the best fly rods made today, but he finds ways. The new Accel and SALT rods took Best of Show and the SALT series took Overall Best of Show. Simon Gawesworth and RIO were also right there in the trophy receiving line with the new RIO Permit Fly Line. We're proud to be aligned with these two American Made Companies who continue to make the best better. rio

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2927 Hits
JUL
10
0

Trout & Tarpon Lines

Often when we pick up a rod to cast and we don't like it, it could be the line that's on the rriood and not the rod itself. It's important to put the right line on a rod but knowing what that "right line" is can be very difficult. Many anglers, ourselves included, prefer to put a line like the RIO Grand on fast action rods and a line like the RIO Gold for slower action rods. With dry fly season here, both east and west, and the need for light, delicate presentations, it's a good time to hear about the new InTouch RIO Gold trout line. Click here to see RIO's new family of Trout Lines.   

 

On the other hand, with memories of our recent tarpon trip to Isla Holbox, Mexico, still fresh in our minds, we'd like to share this excellent clip from Zack Dalton at RIO on choosing the right tarpon line. It makes us want to go back to Mexico for more fun with those fish!  Click here to see the clip

 

It's great to have a company constantly researching new technology, new coatings, new tapers. RIO is the cutting edge because they never sleep. They firmly believe that the very best line ever can still be improved.

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2868 Hits
JUN
03
0

New Rio Product & Kayak Bass Fishing

 

RIO is excited to introduce another great addition to the OutBound Short Series. Click HERE for more info.

west-pe-api.azurewebsites.net

Kayakangler

Also, if you have time, take a minute and check out the Early Summer issue of Kayak Angler. 

They used a great image of Toby Thompson & Cathy fishing for bass on the Susquehanna River.  Barry captured the unique shot from the Interstate 80 bridge.  You can view the Issue HERE

 

kayak

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4014 Hits
MAR
04
0

Expiration date on leaders and tippet

0163DRY FLY SHOW

 

A client asked this week about the relevancy of expiration dates on leaders and tippet spools.  We asked John Harder at RIO for his thoughts on this subject.  John is the Director of R&D, but his co-workers call him the Mono-Man.  He knows his stuff and has given us some valuable information.  Thank you John.

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16755 Hits
JUN
04
0

Rio expands Tippet Collection

Tippet  Rio Products, manufacturer of fly lines, leaders and tippet material, announces the addition of four new tippet materials to it's comprehensive range. 

 They include the Flouroflex Freshwater, Flouroflex Saltwater, the new Rio Saltwater & new Rio Steelhead/Salmon Tippet.  You can read all the details by clicking Here.

 

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6224 Hits
JUL
07
0

How to Clean Fly Lines

Tangled lines are no fun!



Clean fly lines float higher, shoot further, coil less, and last longer. These video clips from RIO are in the most recent issue of MidCurrent Fly Fishing News and demonstrate the easiest, quickest, most effective way to clean a fly line. Make sure your line is clean for best performance.

 

update: the links have been corrected...sorry for the error and thank you for reading!
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4570 Hits
FEB
13
0

Turning over long leaders

As I write this we have been in New Zealand for about 2 weeks. Our trip is about two-thirds over already. New Zealand is known for it's difficult technical fishing. Here on the South Island there aren't a lot of fish, at least not a lot compared to the well-stocked trout streams of Pennsylvania, our home state. That said, there are no stocked trout on these rivers. Each one is a wild fish and each one has survived floods of astronomical proportions, some each year. They are the strongest, smartest survivors. All the others are long gone.

On an average day of fishing, we probably walk 5-6 miles. Some days are shorter hikes, most are longer. Some days if we're lucky we may see a big fish about every mile. Once in a while we might see a couple fish within a short distance of each other but more often than not they are spread out with a lot of water and rocks in between. As if getting to these fish weren't difficult enough, once we find them it can really get technical. Someone once told me that a poor cast doesn't catch any fish and it's more true here than anywhere else.

Our go-to rods this trip are both Sage Rods, a 9' TCX and a 9-1/2' Z-Axis, both 5 weights loaded with Rio Grand willow floating fly lines. We usually keep one rod rigged for dries with a Chocklett cicada, parachute Adams, or Chernobyl beetle. The second rod almost always has two nymphs and often one or both will be a tungsten bead head. Most of the time our leaders are about 18 feet long. Add a pretty stiff breeze, sometimes gusts, and most of the time it seems that the wind is coming straight at us making the cast difficult to turn over and put in the right place.

There have been a dozen times (perhaps my guide would say more) when we finally find a fish, he's moving around feeding, and therefore "catchable". I get into position, get the line out, false cast out to the side of the fish carefully measuring my line only then to drop it either too close or too far upstream, too far right, or too far left. On occasion when I do drop it exactly where I want it, the current grabs it and it either pulls it out of his feeding lane or it drags. If everything is perfect (and I do mean everything), then the fish will usually eat the fly. If I continue to be lucky I will strike at the right nano-second and hook the fish. Then it's a contest to see who is the fittest - him as he races upstream and down or me as I try to dance across the rocks both wet and dry trying to stay connected. Once in a while I win, once in a while he wins.

One of the problems is that first cast that didn't quite work out the way I wanted it to. Probably with trout everywhere, but especially here, if he doesn't eat the first cast he is put on alert and then becomes much harder to fool. It's not to say he can't be caught, but you've just stacked the odds more in his favor and less in yours. Making a good first cast is so very important. It's bad news if it lands wrong or if the leader doesn't turn over and turning over a 18' leader with tungsten bead head nymphs is not for the faint of heart, however there are a couple things that can help us get the job done.

The first thing is to be sure of the amount of line you're casting. This much I've learned the hard way. Thankfully there is usually a white wool indicator on the leader. By casting out to the side of the fish you should most of the time be able to judge how much line you're casting and know when you've got the right amount. Then move the cast back to where the fish is and present it. If you false cast over the fish you will run the risk of him seeing the cast, the indicator, or the shadow of the line.

The second thing that helps me is to not watch the fish but concentrate on the spot up in front of him where you want your fly to land. Your cast will have the tendency to go where you are looking. If you're concentrating on the fish you may hit him on the head with the flies and trust me, they don't like that.

If you're not comfortable casting such a long leader and most of us aren't, get 3 or 4 feet of fly line out beyond your rod tip before starting to cast. When walking from one spot to another, hook the bottom nymph in a snake guide pretty far up the rod and then bring the leader back around the reel seat and reel in the slack. When you're get ready to cast again, pull a couple inches of line off the reel and drop the line from around the reel and while still holding the leader, tap the rod blank and the fly will drop out of the guide. Before letting go of the leader pull some extra fly line out beyond the rod tip with your free hand. Then toss the leader into the water, do a quick roll cast to get it out in front so you can then pick it up and start to cast. This is also a good trick for fishing streamers or nymphs back home with split shot or a sink-tip.

It's important that you remember to lengthen your casting stroke as the amount of line increases that your casting. In other words, as you shoot line thus increasing the amount of line that your casting, lengthen the stroke. Take the rod further back in the back and in the front. Many times, just a couple inches in each direction will smooth out the cast and make it more manageable. Remember the quick stop with the rod tip at each end of the casting stroke so you don't sacrifice line speed.

Another thing that will help a lot is a good sharp single haul at the end of the forward cast to help increase line speed and turn over the long leader and heavy flies. Whenever you need more line speed, it will be easier to get it from a good haul (in the right place) then to try casting the rod harder which can result in a tailing loop. In this example, it's important to put the haul at the front end of the forward cast. Don't spread it out over the entire casting stroke because you'll waste most of it. Wait until the rod gets in front of your shoulder before starting the haul.

The last thing is to make sure you're far enough behind the fish to make a cast using some fly line. It's easy to sneak up behind the fish and sometimes we can get so close that we don't have much line to cast. This is especially true in rough water or when the fish is deep. By getting back a bit further we put more distance between us and the fish, therefore using more fly line to reach the fish which makes the cast easier to execute. It is much harder to cast just the leader when you're close then it is to cast a few yards of fly line and leader. Simply backing up may make the cast easier in the long run.

Places like New Zealand make us become better anglers. So much of the time, it's little things that we can do that make us better fishermen. That said, I think my guide is waiting for me. We'll see what today brings! Cathy.





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