OCT
21
0

Paying Homage to the Bighorn

2013 4106BIGHORN RIVER

 

 

 

Barry wrote an interesting blog about his take on the Bighorn River.  The article recently appeared on RIO's website and I wanted to highlight it here so you all didn't miss it.  Click here to be directed to the RIO Blog.

 

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SEP
02
0

Come fish our Home Waters this Fall

There's no place prettier in the fall than the northeast, particularly so on o09 Huge Brown Trout0022ur freestone streams.  Our home stream, Fishing Creek, is heading into fall with excellent water levels and lots of healthy fish.

rainbow

 

Terrestrial fishing will stay good until the hard frosts come - along with baetis and cinnamon ants.  It's a beautiful time of year to be on the water.  We still have a few days available for guided fall fishing.  It's a short season and winter is just around the corner.  Treat yourself.  View our Guided Fishing page here and contact us for available dates. 

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MAY
20
0

From Fishing Creek

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s with much of the country, our spring has been cold and late. We're just now seeing March Browns hatching and no one knows what happened to the Hendricksons. We simply didn't see2613 BECK IMAGE 2014 them. We had a beautiful hatch of Grannom Caddis and March Browns yesterday afternoon and it was nice to see rising fish. We've had a good guiding season so far, but everyone is still wearing heavy layers under their waders and often starting the day in down vests. Three fish over 25" were landed this week and lots of fish in the 16" - 22". Although we had a cold winter, the fish wintered well and are in excellent shape. Here are some recent guiding client photos and you can check out our guiding page for more information on scheduling a trip to visit us.  

 

Up until just a few days ago, most of the fish were caught on nymphs and split shot. It's nice to be back up on top. Our March Browns should last for a couple weeks and will lead right into the Sulphur hatch. We have a number of different Sulphurs here on our stream but the most common is on a size 16 hook. Our favorite patterns continue to be comparaduns.   COMPARA DUN 1877-2 The high deer hair wing makes the fly float well and easy to see. It's also very durable and will last through many fish. After the Sulphurs, we'll see Lt. Cahills and Slate Drakes. With the arrival of these two hatches, we'll know for sure that summer is here. 

 

Memorial Day usually means the beginning of the terrestrial season with beetles, hoppers, crickets, inch worms, ants, and others. This is always a fun time of year because when these insects fall into the water it's seldom a quiet landing. A big beetle makes a plop and struggles which often gets the attention of a fish immediately. After a few weeks of delicate presentations with dry flies, it's fun to fish a big foam beetle in the riffle or along a grass bank. You never know who might show up! The Super beetle can easily support trailing a pheasant tail or inch worm behind and it's nice to offer a couple of options to the fish. I'd recommend using 4x though if you can.

1847 BECK IMAGE 2014-2Our Comparadun and Super Beetle Selections will keep you prepared and ready for late spring and summer fishing. You can find them here in our website Store.  This is an exciting time in the east, lots of hatches, rising fish, and fun patterns to use. We hope you have a great season and get out often to enjoy all that spring fishing offers.

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MAY
08
0

New Zealand 2015 Dates Announced- Feb 1-20

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Cathy recently wrote: We have spent at least 20 years exploring New Zealand and have found what we believe to be the two premier must-do lodges on the South Island. In Hanmer Springs, Riverview Lodge and near Murchison, Owen River Lodge. We have visited these two lodges annually for a number of years and we don't think you'll find better fishing anywhere. Come with us in February and experience the Everest of Trout Fishing. You'll never forget New Zealand - the people, the scenery, and especially the fishing. Read the complete itinerary and contact us if you have any questions. (Shorter stays available).  Click here to see the trip information on our website

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FEB
20
0

2 Weeks in Beautiful South Island, New Zealand

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If you aren't signed up for the Frontiers Blog, you may not have seen Cathy & Barry's blog from New Zealand the past 2 weeks.  Here it is in case you missed it.  We're glad to have them back home but it looks like it was an amazing trip.

 

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JUN
16
0

Photographing Fish


We handle fish almost daily as either instructor, trip host, or fishing photographer. In all of these situations we want to capture the image and at the same time be sure that we are releasing a healthy fish that is not stressed or exhausted. Insuring the survival of the fish always takes priority over the photograph and there have been many times when we quickly released the fish without the photograph.

Sometimes we have to consider our own safety. Toothy fish like barracuda and sharks come to mind and even a small Jack Crevalle can give a nasty wound if handled improperly. Heck, we can get a sore hand by getting poked with the dorsal fin of a harmless panfish! These potentially hazardous situations can result from getting our hands too close to a mouthful of teeth (as in barracuda), or coming in contact with a sharp spine or gill plate (jack or snook), or an actual intended bite (shark). Cathy once grabbed a decaying sockeye salmon for a photo in Alaska and got her fingers inside its mouth of teeth. It took a month of antibiotics to get rid of the infection caused by bacteria in the rotting process. Be careful where you put your hands. Consider using a boca grip on a big fish to safely handle it for a photograph.

This is the system we use when we photograph fish. The longer a fish is out of the water the better the odds are of it not surviving. If the fish is in good shape one of us will compose the photo while the other is holding the fish safely underwater either gently cradling it or using a net. The person in charge of the fish can be getting it into the correct position for the photograph before lifting it when the photographer gives the word. If the head of the fish is gently cradled in one hand while gripping just ahead of the tail with the other hand, you’ll see plenty of the fish in the photograph and have a comfortable hold on it. For big or especially slippery fish a fishing glove or even a sun glove will help grip the tail. Make sure the glove is wet to protect the fish.

Our first photo will be a test shot of the angler holding the fish in the water. Then we'll check the photo for proper composition, lighting, etc. We may need to do this a couple times. When everything looks good, we'll let the angler know we're ready and on a count of three, the fish is lifted out of the water, the angler smiles, and the photographer fires three quick shots and the fish goes back underwater. We may repeat this process a couple times but with each “lift” the fish is only out of the water for about 5 seconds.

We cringe when we see an angler with a fish out of the water flopping around on the side of the river
while he gets his camera out of his pocket, turns it on, checks the program, and finally gets around to trying to hold the fish with one hand and photograph with the other. The only thing worse might be having the fish fall our of your hands in the boat or it landing in the dirt and stones alongside the water from an angler in a standing position. We always try to keep the net close by and the fish close to the water. If he slips away from us unharmed, so be it.

If the images look good in the preview, it’s time to release the fish. We’re still holding the fish with a firm grip just ahead of the tail keeping it in an upright position in the water. If it’s not anxious to go we slowly move it in a figure-eight or circular motion facing into the current making the gills work. Make sure the fish is in clean water where turtle grass, moss, sand, or mud won't foul the gills. If it's a trout, the water should be cold as well as clean. In saltwater, if the fish is exhausted or bleeding there may be predator fish in the area waiting for a chance to get at him. If it starts to turn sideways or goes upside down it’s in trouble, rescue it and repeat the revival process.

Remember, making sure the fish is healthy and not in any danger is the most important factor.
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