Report from Argentina, Facial Scanning & Spring Fishing Tips

Report from Argentina

Barry and Cathy are finishing up in Argentina as I write this week. They had a beautiful week of warm fall weather at Estancia Tecka the first week but the second week proved to be more difficult with wind at San Huberto. The volcano had fresh snow almost everyday and through it all, some very nice fish were caught. We will have a report from the Limay River next week, but click here to see a few shots from the first two lodges.

Check out the new rotisserie video clip.

Facial Scanning at Airportsfacial scanning

An interesting new screening process is coming to U.S. Airports. We've used it in several international airports this spring and it's fast and efficient. Read more about it here.

 

 

10 Spring Fishing Tips

1. When possible, cast down or use a reach cast so the fish see the fly before they see the fly line. Your fly line in the water will alert the fish to your presence.


2. The deeper pools will have a warmer water temperature than the riffles. In the spring trout will like these areas better. As the water warms, they will begin to spread out.


3. Water on the surface moves faster than water underneath so when fishing nymphs be sure you have enough weight to get the fly down. Consider using tungsten.


4. Don't be discouraged if you find off-color water. Fish feed often and muddy water can mean that more food is in the water and you can often get away with using larger darker flies. Pay attention to areas where muddy water is mixing with cleaner water.


5. During spring hatches when many fish are feeding, pick one and concentrate on that fish. You will catch more fish this way than by shot-gunning the water with random casts.


SPRING FLY FISHING 17506. Fish are less active when water is very cold. Slow down your retrieve when fishing streamers and be sure your fly is on the bottom. If you're not occasionally picking up debris off the bottom you may not be on the bottom. If you're hung up continuously, switch to a slightly lighter fly. 


7. Dry Dropper. When fishing a dry fly, add a dropper about 10-12 inches by using a clinch knot off the bend of the dry fly. This will increase your odds of catching fish. On a larger dry use a spring nymph like a quill gordon, Hendrickson, or march brown. On smaller flies, or if the dry is being pulled under by the nymph, switch to a small bead head pheasant tail, BWO, or caddis pupae. Slow down the cast and stop for a second longer on the back cast to prevent tangles.


8. Use the appropriate tippet size for your hook size. Generally speaking, use 3X for hook sizes 10-14; 4X for 12-16; 5X for 14-18; and 6X for 16-22. For heavier flies, err on the heavy side and for lighter, go lighter. The dropper should be a same size or one size lighter than the lead fly.


9. Stalk your fish. Wear neutral earthy colors and approach carefully from behind or downstream. Fish have very good eyesight and can readily pick up movement on the bank, especially when the water is clear.


10. When blind casting always start with short casts and then add a little line to each cast so that you cover the water near you first. Fish are often closer than you think. Learn to spot fish in the water.

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