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NOV
01
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Fall in Maine, The View from Cathy's Window, & Chasing Trout with Maddie Brennenman

Friend and client, Art Rorex, recently attended a photo workshop in Maine. We asked him to share a few thoughts with us:

A Fall in Maine

Thanks to Barry and Cathy I’ve been privileged to fish in some of the most interesting and beautiful places in the world. However, because I’m on a fishing trip I usually don’t take nearly enough time to appreciate that beauty. Fortunately, there are also countless beautiful places here at home. This fall I spent a week in one of them.

Acadia National Park was established in 1919 through the efforts of local individuals who wanted to preserve the undeveloped land around Bar Harbor. Although the original reservation was only 6,000 acres, the park now has over 47,000 acres with 158 miles of hiking trails and the coastline of Mount Desert Island. Photo opportunities are everywhere and, when combined with the rest of the Maine coast, nearly limitless.

Days started at 6:30 on the beach ready for sunrise. Mornings and afternoons were spent in the birch woods, on the trails and along the streams. Evenings were reserved for photo editing. In the end, it was a great time that produced some very satisfying photos -- kind of like one of Barry and Cathy’s fishing trips.

DSC 0972 DxO  DSC 0556 DxO

  Click here to see more of Art's photos from his trip

The View from My Window

Cathy here. I sometimes talk about the view from my office window. Our offices are in our home and mine is in the back of the house facing into the woods. Barry, Brooke, and Susie are out front and I think I have the best spot. Anyway, I can look out my window and watch deer, birds, turkeys, squirrels, and once in a great while a black bear.

Over the years we have always had lots of whitetail deer and I enjoy watching them, especially when the first snow is on their winter coats. We've never allowed any hunting around the house – until this year. In recent years our deer population has exploded and we have too many deer. They are smaller now because they have to compete for food and the undergrowth has disappeared from our woods since they eat everything they can reach. So, when a friend asked if he could bring his 9 year old son and come and hunt archery, we said yes!IMG 2368

We see Chris & Jase going into the blind after school and sometimes in the early morning we'll see the truck and will know that Chris is in the blind. We can imagine the discussions father and son have in the quiet of the woods while patiently waiting for a good shot. For Chris, I think it's a chance to spend time with Jase. It's obvious the bond they share in their blind in our woods and we are thankful that we can be a small part of the experience.

We could have snow in a couple weeks and the blind will be gone, but for now it's part of my landscape.

Chasing Trout with Maddie Brenneman

I like these short spotlight videos on outdoor people. Maddie Brenneman is an inspiration to young women. Do what you love and be who you are. She reminds us that we all need to get outdoors and....be alive.

https://midcurrent.com/2018/09/13/video-hatch-chasing-trout-with-maddie-brenneman/?utm_source=MidCurrent+Fly+Fishing+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=2e9f97861c-MidCurrent_October_5_2017_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8efbf3b958-2e9f97861c-18929377

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OCT
25
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Argentina Trips, Spain Recap & Sink-Tips

Tres Valles & San Huberto

March 16-23 & 24-30, 2019

2011 RIO MALLEO0828Our departures are shaping up nicely at Tres Valles and San Huberto for March, but we still have a couple rooms available at each lodge. These are two of our very favorite destinations in Patagonia for dry fly fishing on small to medium size streams. Tres Valles also offers exciting opportunities for trophy trout in clear mountain lakes. At San Huberto, you'll fish the beautiful Rio Malleo spring creek on private beats as it flows through the 2010 TRES VALLES02128 024estancia.

Both destinations excel at pampering their guests with accommodations, meals, and fishing in grand style. Come with us and enjoy a week (or two) of grand Argentina hospitality. Check out our itineraries and photo galleries and join us!

Spain Review

We had a great trip to Spain recently. It was fall in the Pyrenees, weather was good, fishing was great. Juan Antonio spoiled us with wine and food and I can't think of a thing that could have been better – from high country fishing for zebra trout and wild browns to the big fish in the tail water streams. Mix in some fall colors, medieval villages, cathedrals, and ancient stone bridges and well, it was simply a great week. We hope you'll take a look at a few of our favorite shots here. 

 

Sink-Tips

rioAre you confused about sink-tips, T-Tips, iMOW tips? While this is geared toward steelhead fishing, it's still a great short piece on understanding some of the sink-tips that RIO offers.
https://mailchi.mp/rioproducts/time-to-get-the-right-sink-tips?e=8b5f86f70f

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OCT
18
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Update from Spain & Saying Good Bye by Rick Minogue

Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone who has been affected by recent hurricanes and severe weather events

Report from Spain


Spain started out rainy for the first two days, but we are still finding some nice fish. The rain has stopped and the sun is out so the rest of the week should be excellent. We love this country!

spain 2

 

Saying Good Bye

For many years Rick Minogue was a regular on our section of Fishing Creek.  Since relocating to Colorado, he now gets in about once a year. We've saved his story for about a year waiting for it to be "season appropriate". As another trout season winds down, his story will touch all of us.  We hope you have a favorite piece of water that you feel the same about.  Thank you, Rick, for sharing your thoughts, emotions, and photos with us and our readers.

Saying Goodbye to Another Trout Season

                It was late on a late fall afternoon on Fishing Creek, near Benton, Pennsylvania.

Years ago, I lived within easy driving distance of this place. Now that I lived in Colorado, there were plenty of reasons to return several times a year, and I placed myself in this water whenever the stars aligned. Out west, my winters were about snowshoeing, hiking, and getting a winter summit. To fish this lovely Pennsylvania creek in late autumn was to say farewell to my PA Trout Season, and to trout fishing everywhere until next winter/early spring.

Autumn RainBy the time I arrived, the rain was falling in sheets and bands. I dashed to the picnic pavilion and sat in the middle on one of the benches. Rain poured down, hammering the tin roof and foaming the water of the creek. Everything looked thirsty, so I was happy for it. Still, I remembered the days when I would have seized yesterday’s clear weather to ensure I got at least one dry day on the water. Colorado makes you forget that it rains other places. I’d forgotten that. It was clear last night, so I expected it to be clear today. I rigged a fresh 9’ 5wt tapered leader and added a few feet of 6x. It was a nice job, if I do say so myself. Finally impatient, I pulled my hood over my hat to keep my neck dry, and when the rain slowed a tad, I walked upstream and waded in.

I worked my way up through a wooded stretch. It’s always been my favorite section of this water. So serene and intimate. At the top, I caught a nice fish in the lee of a fallen tree. Then I was out into washout where the bend cliff was very close and water lapped against it shallowly in a nice tumbling run. I picked up a few good fish and played them back to my hands. I stood up after rinsing my net and fingers. The rain was tapering off. Looking upstream, a section of brush along the left hand bank was glowing with golds and crimsons. The trees towering over them were mostly barren, and on the right, the whole hill pulsed with color. Further up, I remembered the place where once upon a long time ago, I’d shed my laundry on a slow day and swam up and down through the frigid current, laughing and splashing.

I crept up stealthily. I cast gently. A trout shot out of the water surface and cleared it with three inches of air between his tail and the water. He was huge – a four pounder at least. He crashed back into the water less than a foot from where my fly was floating. I focused on a leafy section of water surface and cast the fly so that only 3 inches projected beyond the leaf. On purpose, but totally accidentally, I managed to do what I intended – hide the tippet on a raft of leaves. I was congratulating myself when a savage splashing object erupted from below. I saw it hit the fly hard, and I knew I had a good hookset. The trout was instantly panicked and splashed out of the water, tailwalking and flashing with all the life of the Universe. It went deep, making a run for the far bank. I barely had time to get it on the reel before I was giving back line. The fish was big and strong. I was totally confident I had him well hooked and clean. While he was making his run away from me, I pulled my phone out. I wanted some photos. I was turning it on when he turned around and came straight at me. I tried to hold the phone over the water and still strip line.

The phone won. By the time I had gathered enough line to get it neat, the fish was gone. I felt stupid and vain. I had gotten exactly what I wanted – a monster on the spookiest water possible, and I had let him go trying to capture him twice. I was an idiot. I cast repeatedly, but knew the pool was spooked. I also knew I didn’t deserve another. Not by my rules or theirs. I was disappointed in myself for not living in the moment. I was trying to capture it, which is very much not the same as living in it.

By now it was late afternoon and I’d caught fish as far upstream as the upper boundary permitted, so I found the old railroad grade and wandered downstream toward the Home Pool. I was still the only person on the entire stretch of water. Despite the earlier showers, the water was low, the current barely detectable. Occasionally, a huge fish rose. The commotion was startling. I waded in slowly, being careful to keep my ripples downstream.

The sun edged further toward the western horizon, peeking out from behind the clouds, and I paused to capture images for my desktop screen savers.   I cast thoughtfully, determined to use only a dryfly. I was glad there was no one nearby to tell me I should be using a streamer or something else more effective. As the late Ernie Schwiebert would have said, this was one of my “Rivers of Memory”. That is not to say that I only relived memories, but this was a place where many of my best trout fishing memories resided.

As the sun sank, so did the temperature. Once so warm earlier in the day, I pressed my elbows into my sides, trying to conserve heat. I started to shiver.

After tying on a cinnamon ant, I cast it far downstream, checked the line in midair, watched the fly drop softly, shook out some slack, then allowed the current to move it into position. As I admired it, the water bulged underneath and a gaping maw opened. I was too ready and lifted the rod a split second before the big mouth closed. The line came home in a tangle around my rod and head.

That should have been my Home Pool fish.  This calendar year’s Final Trout.

As if for emphasis, another one, a true Home Pool Monster, gave a full-bodied out-of-the-water slam for something tasty just a little further downstream from my volunteer. This one belly-flopped, smacking down hard. Do trout get red skin from belly flopping?

Suddenly I was filled with the longing of years and happy memories.   As I’ve done so many other times, I sighed and reeled in knowing the golden moment had passed. To punctuate the end, I broke off my fly. Then, turning upstream I said this prayer:

                                                                                ……………

Dear God,

 

Thank you for Fishing Creek. Thank you for Barry and Cathy. Thank you for their friendship all these years after I discovered them and flyfishing by quiet accident. Thank you for the cabin. Thank you for Pennsylvania. I love this place. I love these trees. I love this water and I love these fish. Thank you for allowing me to play here yet another year. No matter what happens, I will never be quite ready to leave this place and this beauty and this amazing life I’m living.

 

Thank you for my joy and my family and my job and the big mountains and easy creeks of Colorado. Help me to be a good friend, dad, husband and all that other stuff.   And right here, right now, let me hold this firmly in my heart for just one more Open Minute.

 

“Thank you, Barry and Cathy” I called out. “Thank you Trout and Fishing Creek! I love you and I miss you. I may never live close by again, but you will always live close by in my heart.”

 

Pausing, then more quietly, I said, “I love you and I thank you. Goodnight and goodbye to another year of trout fishing.

Your friend,

 

                YondeR  Leaves on Fishing Creek

                                                                                ……………..

It was quiet.

Leaves fluttered down.

The lowering sun went behind a cloud.

The water moved languidly as another monster broke the surface 100 yards downstream.

                                                                                ……………..

And that’s how another Trout Season ended.

 

Rick Minogue lives in Louisville, CO. He publishes selected journal entries on his website – https://www.rickminogue.com

 

 

               

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OCT
11
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Getting Ready for Salmon/Steelhead, Guiding, & New Caddis Pupa Pattern

Getting Ready for Salmon/Steelhead?riologo

If you often find yourself in tight brushy spots on medium size rivers, you know how important the fly line is to the cast. These places exist a lot on the Erie tributaries – high banks, no room to back cast. Watch this short film on RIO's Short Scandi Versitip. If you're fishing switch or short spey rods, it may just be the line you're looking for!   

https://www.rioproducts.com/products/lines-heads/rio-scandi-short-versitip

Guiding This Past Week

Fall has arrived. We had a beautiful week of fall weather and good fishing. Slate Drakes, cinnamon caddis, ants, and of course nymphs provided our clients with pleasant, productive days on the water.

Weather permitting, we'll fish up to Thanksgiving, but October and early November is certainly the most popular and most enjoyable time to be on the water.

We hope you are getting out to enjoy it! Come and fish with us.

dennis

 Ira  jeff

Tying the Beefy Bean with Ethan Martin

Looking for a new caddis pupa pattern that sinks quickly and draws attention? Well, then this might be the one! Add it to your winter fly tying pattern list.

https://midcurrent.com/2018/09/17/video-hatch-beefy-bean-fly-tying-tutorial/?utm_source=MidCurrent+Fly+Fishing+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=2e9f97861c-MidCurrent_October_5_2017_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8efbf3b958-2e9f97861c-189293

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OCT
04
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Jim's Tips, Fall in PA, & How to Fish the Upstream Dry Fly

Jim's Tips

October Fly Fishing Tips  

Where has time gone? I can't believe I'm writing about October fly fishing…. and we all know what is coming next in the weather forecast.

October can be the last chance to fish for active trout before winter sets in. And as everyone on the east coast is aware, the heavy rains and flooding has not given us much chance to be on the water. Here we missed some of the best hatches of the year because of the high and fast water.

Jim 0070One thing to keep in mind with fall fishing is that you can sleep in a little longer. You don't need be on the water at day break like you do in the heat of the summer. In summertime most of us fish in the early morning and late evening to avoid the heat of the day and it's the best time to find active feeding fish. If you are an archery hunter you can be in your tree stand until mid-morning and then head to the trout stream for mid-afternoon fly fishing. And then head back to the tree stand for the evening hunt.

The cooler evening air temperatures result in colder water temperatures and the trout can be lethargic in early mornings and in the late evenings once the sun leaves the water. Trout will be the most active in the sun-warmed water of mid-day.

With the colder air and water temperatures, be sure that you dress for the changing conditions. My gear bag has gloves, hand warmers, heavier socks and shirts or jackets so I'm ready for changes in weather.

Low water conditions, bright sunlight and bright fall foliage make it very important to wear more natural earth color clothing than any other time of the year. Move slowly and as stealthily as possible.

Fly selection changes too with October fishing. The rule of thumb I use is to either go big or go small. I like small dry flies and nymphs for fall fly fishing and early October can produce great dry fly fishing with ants, beetles and hoppers. I like to fish a beetle with a size 18 or 20 BH (bead head) pheasant tail or caddis pupa as a drop fly. Flying ants are still around for a while and can be a lot fun to fish if you are lucky enough to see them on the water. As for mayflies, the most common fall mayfly in our area would be the Blue-winged Olives in sizes 18 and 20's. We do have some October Caddis along with size 16 and 18 tan caddis that can give you dry fly action especially in the warmest part of the day.

Trout feeding habits also change in October. Brook and brown trout are getting ready for the spawn and the big browns can put on the feed bag. I catch some of the biggest brown trout of the season at this time of year. On occasions I will just hunt big fish. And then I usually use a large streamer such as a Cathy's Super Bugger. If the water conditions calls for it, I will use a sinking tip line. Another effective technique is to dead drift a large bugger or sculpin pattern with a nymph as your trailing fly. Be sure to let the nymph swing off the bottom at the end of the drift and be ready for a big brown to take it. Hunting for big browns usually doesn't mean a lot of trout in the net but just possibly the biggest trout of the season.Jim 0071

Add a little color to your nymphs. I'm not sure why but nymphs and streamers with orange beads or orange hot spots behind a black bead head work very well in the fall. Red and chartreuse hot spots can also get a trout’s attention this time of year.

As I mentioned before the brown and brook trout are spawning which means there are eggs in the water and egg patterns can also be very effective in October.

Be sure to be aware of spawning fish. Watch out for redds (spawning beds) when wading in the water and be careful not to fish to spawning resident fish. But you can fish to the other fish that are downstream of the redd who will be eating the eggs and nymphs that are floating by. On many occasions I have seen fishermen walk through fish redds completely unaware. You will find spawning fish in riffles at the tail of large pools which are where fishermen are wading to cross the stream. Redds without mature fish on them still hold life and should be avoided when wading. If I spot a redd I let other fishermen know where they are and ask them to be careful when wading. If you not sure what a redd looks like Google “Fish Redds” and you will see many examples.

Here on Fishing Creek and other local trout streams we have spawning trout and we are always careful to protect them as much as possible. On many occasions I have caught small stream born browns and rainbows on Fishing Creek and it's really cool to briefly hold one of these beautiful trout before releasing it.

I'm surprised at how many fly fishermen have told me they never fish in October. October offers great fishing, great photo opportunities and it’s a wonderful time to be outdoors.

Fall in PA

fall blogOctober is a beautiful month here in the northeast. Soon all of our trees will be dressed in their most vibrant colors and warm fall days will be calling out fishermen, hunters, and hikers to the streams, fields, and trails for a final bittersweet good-bye until next year. Trout will be showing off spectacular spawning colors and will be busy building redds and producing another generation of wild trout for us to admire later on.

If you’re thinking about coming to our valley to enjoy the fishing or perhaps the water fall trails at Rickett’s Glen State Park or to take advantage of the State Game Lands, now is the time to make plans and to firm up reservations.

Here are a few of our favorite fall images, we hope you enjoy them and we hope to see you in the next month.  

How to Fish the Upstream Dry Fly  

The seventh episode of season Two of RIO's “How To” series. RIO ambassador Rob Parkins explains the advantages of fishing a dry fly upstream.

This is an excellent example of many techniques we use while fly fishing. If you are a relatively new fly angler, pay special attention to Rob's harionds as he controls the line, notice how the fish are not out in the middle of the riffle but are hugging the seam between the fast and the slow water along the edge. Learn how to spot rises and then while staying well back from the fish cast a couple feet above him allowing the fly and tippet to drift down to him while keeping the heavy part of the leader and the fly line well away from the fish.

Thank you Rob and RIO.  

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Purple Super Buggers, Video Hatch & Beaver Believers

Purple Super Bugger

purpleOur best selling streamer just got better and may just become our favorite color of all. This has been a season of high off-color water here and in many parts of the country. We've used lots of streamers and heavy nymphs and the new purple super bugger has won hands down against all the other colors in difficult water conditions. Size 4 & 6. Visit our store.

Video Hatch: “Water and Blood”
from Sage Fly Fish/Erin Block and Nathaniel Maddux

This thoughtful film reflects on family and connection to place, with beautiful footage of fly fishing for smallmouth bass. Thanks to Erin Block and MidCurrent. Enjoy.

 

The Beaver Believers

Nature's engineers are usually good for trout, and TU is working to bring beavers back where they're needed most. It turns out that beaver dams, sitting water, swamps, and bogs are not so bad – even good. Mother Nature knew what she was doing after all.

https://www.tu.org/blog-posts/the-beaver-believers?utm_source=informz&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=informz

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Fall Fishing, Bighorn Review & Some Days are Easier Than Others

Fall Fishing

DSC 0041

 

We're headed into what is, for many of us, our favorite time of year. Many places, like here, have had a tough late summer. For once we didn't have low water but too much water for most of the season. In between high water times there was some very good fishing but the unpredictable weather made it difficult to schedule ahead. Hopefully the weather will settle down (there is no rain in the forecast) and we'll have a beautiful fall season. We are all ready for it. You can see that the fish and the water are in great shape. Come out and join us for some guided fall fishing.

 

Bighorn Review

1692 BIGHORN 2018It was a very different year on the Bighorn this year. A record breaking snow pack last winter resulted in high water releases all season...until, luckily, a couple weeks before we arrived. We found the river low and at a great level to fish well, but unfortunately it was also warm and off color. The tricos appeared everyday as we hoped and there was dry fly fishing. Lots of fish were caught but we had to work harder for them than in other years. Let's hope for normal weather both east and west for next season! Here are a few of our favorite images from the August trip.

 

“Some Days are Easier Than Others”

We found this short story by Bob Romano in MidCurrent. We love the north woods and have had some fishing adventures in Maine. It's a humorous fall fishing story with a slight twist at the end. We hope you enjoy it.

https://midcurrent.com/techniques/some-days-are-easier-than-others/?utm_source=MidCurrent+Fly+Fishing+Email+Newsletter&utm_campaign=9552876854-MidCurrent_October_5_2017_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_8efbf3b958-9552876854-18929377

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Trips, Ants & East Rosebud

The Rio Malleo
March 24 – 30, 2019

2013 ARGENTINA 3232The late author Ernest Schweibert dubbed the Rio Malleo in Patagonia, Argentina, as the Queen of all spring creeks, and we agree. Set below Lanin Volcano, this private fishery offers 20 miles of true spring creek experience with weed-choked channels, blue-winged olive hatches, selective trout, canyon sections that will remind one of Montana's Gallatin River, long placid pools with sipping browns and rainbows, willows, cut banks, the Muddy Lagoon (possibly for your trip fish), and so much more.

In a valley bordered by monkey puzzle trees and the call of a red stag in rut, you will find San Huberto Lodge. Owned and operated by the Olsen family, now in the fourth generation. This is a true Argentina experience. Join us for a week on the Malleo, fine Malbec wine, and amazing Argentina hospitality. Read the itinerary.

Belize River Lodge
April 27 – May 4, 2019

We honestly don't know how many trips we've hosted over the years to Belize River Lodge, but one thing is for sure – we always have a good time. In a way it's like going home to see old friends, enjoy great food, and of course there is the fishing.

Like most saltwater destinations, you never know what you're going to find. It could be an 80-pound tarpon on the the City 1698 TARPON BELIZE 2017 Flats, or if you're lucky a tailing permit on the reef, perhaps bonefish in skinny water, or you can head into the back country for snook or baby tarpon. And all the while, there is amazing bird life, howler monkeys, manatees, etc.

The Belize City airport is easy in & out, and the lodge is just minutes away – literally. Come along with us for a shot at a grand slam....and maybe a super slam. Click for details.

East Rosebud Fly Shop
Billings, Montana

When we're in Billings, Montana, we always stop at the East Rosebud Fly Shop on South 24th St. Talk about a well-stocked shop, this is it. If you can't find it anywhere else, I'll bet Rich has it. From every fly tying material you can think of to a complete inventory of gear and accessories for the fly fisherman. Stop in if you're in Billings. https://eastrosebudflyandtackle.com

IMG 2003 IMG 2001

When the Ants Fall

In a couple weeks we will have an excellent opportunity to encounter a fall of winged ants. Ants fall throughout autumn from ant1late September through early November. You never know when you might find ants on the water, but one thing is for sure – if you're lucky enough to find them, they will bring even the largest fish to the surface. It might be small size 20 black winged ants or larger size 16 winged cinnamon ants. It happens every year so be sure to have a few of each size and color in your box. It's pretty incredible fishing when it happens!  Shop for ants hereant2

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Fishing after the Flood, Dr Slick Products, & Sage's BackCountry Season

JIM'S TIPS -- Fishing After the Flood!

Throughout northeastern Pennsylvania the 2018 trout season will be one for the record books jimor one most people would rather forget. Here in Fishing Creek Valley the town of Benton made the national nightly news showing the flooding throughout the town. Fortunately no lives were lost in this historic flooding throughout Pennsylvania.

DSC 0002Most streams are back to more normal water flows and it's time to get back on the water and catch some fish. I've been out several times in the last few weeks checking out different areas and finding that things have changed in most areas along the streams.

First time I was on the water after the water receded I actually found some trout caught in small pools and I was able to net them and return to the stream. Unfortunately, I also found several trout that didn't survive the ordeal.

With the Fall Season just around the corner it's a good idea to go to your favorite fishing spots and checkout to see what damage has been done to roads and trails leading into and around the stream. Many trails and paths are blocked by huge log jams and debris is everywhere on the banks and in the stream. I found refrigerators, chairs, dumpsters, pumpkins and other trash. And it would be a good idea to bring a garbage bag to pickup some of the smaller debris that litters the area.

More than likely the stream as you knew it has changed. Some holes are filled in and some have deepen. With the unevenDSC 0004 stream bottom wading can be more difficult and be aware of the changes in the stream bottom. Using a wading staff would be a very good idea in these new conditions.

Be aware mosquitoes are everywhere and will drive you crazy. Bugs spray or lotion is a must. I understand that the West Nile Virus has been found in mosquitoes in this area. Natural Fly, mosquitoes and tick repellent made by Pixie Soaps is the best I found to keep mosquitoes and ticks at bay.

In the areas that I fish I've found that the majority of the fish have survived and many are spread out because of the different changes in the stream bottom. One technique I use to locate fish is to use a small white or yellow streamer or wooly bugger and work it through the pools to see if the trout will chase it or flash at it. In shallow riffles a large stimulator dry fly will often get trout to come up take a look.

Here on Fishing Creek the water flow is good and water temperatures are in a good range to catch trout. Although now I'm catching trout early in the morning before the heat of the day, next week's weather forecast calls for more September-like weather conditions and the fishing will improve.

Late summer and early fall trout fishing can produce some of the best fly fishing of the season. The second brood of Slate Drakes should be hatching here on Fishing Creek soon, although I haven't seen many of the shucks on the rocks yet. Fishing a Slate Drake size 12 nymph usually works well in early September. Slate Drake nymphs are swimmers and they don't hide under the rocks but sit on top gathering food as it floats by. One of the more productive ways I like to fish them is without an indicator and slowly retrieve the fly towards the shore line. Don't forget BWO's and October Caddis as the season progresses. Terrestrials such as beetles, ants, small caddis dries, and hoppers are my go to flies this time of year. In deep pools a stone fly pattern such as a Ugg nymph with a pheasant tail nymph as a trailer fly can produces some nice trout.

On sunny days in small pools and riffles small size 16 to 20 bead heads nymphs such has a Rainbow Warrior, Flashback Pheasant Tail, Copper Johns (in different colors) and small Caddis nymphs can bring a few trout to the net. As we get later into September small egg patterns will also be a good choice.

Maybe it's been a while since you've gotten out because of the high water and flooding this summer. So it's time to get on back the water and check out the areas you usually fish and make up for the lost time. In general, there are plenty of trout and they have not been fished over much in the last few weeks. The one thing that you'll find is a very different stream than you knew before the flooding. In a strange way it's exciting to relearn the pools and riffles and decide what is the best way to fish them. As I get older seasons go back so quickly and I don't plan on wasting a moment of what is left of the 2018 season.

Dr. Slick Fans

slickDr. Slick fans will be happy to hear about new Razor scissors and pliers. Serious anglers and fly tiers will recognize the Dr. Slick name as a name they can trust. Thank you Angling Trade News for bringing us this news release.
https://www.anglingtrade.com/2018/08/29/dr-slick-2019-highlights-razor-sharp-scissors-new-pliers/

 

Hosted Trips 2019

This is what our 2019 schedule is looking like.

January 12-19 Coyhaique River Lodge, Chile
February 9-16 Laguna Verde, Argentina (Jurassic Lake)
February 17-23 Estancia Tecka, Argentina
March 16-23 Tres Valles Lodge, Argentina
March 24-30 San Huberto Hosteria, Argentina
March 30-Apr. 6 Limay River Lodge, Argetina
Apr. 27-May 4 Belize River Lodge, Belize
June 19-28 Slovenia
July 25-Aug.10 Africa Photo Safari
Aug. 23-Sept.7 Bighorn River, Montana
October Spain (dates TBA)
Nov.30-Dec.7 Tres Valles Lodge, Argentina

Alpine Gold
Sage BackCountry Season

Is the trail calling.....come before winter? Mike Tea reminds us that the days are getting shorter, the nights longer, and we better get out there.

https://www.sageflyfish.com/experience/seasons/2018-backcountry?utm_source=Sage+Newsletter&utm_campaign=7126485b29-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_08_29_04_06&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_a4f998861d-7126485b29-85101789

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Alaska Photos, Single Handed Spey Cast & Salmon Systems

Alaska Album

3814ALASKA 2018We've put together a small album of some of our favorite shots from the recent Alaska trip. The silver salmon fishing was unbelievable and along with the silvers came dolly varden, chum, rainbows and pinks. It was fast and furious fishing and we're already looking forward to returning to Reel Action Camp on the Kanektok River in August of 2020. We hope you can join us.  Click here to view Barry's photos from the trip.

Single Handed Spey Cast

If you are ever in a situation with too little room behind you to make a back cast, and find that the roll cast doesn't give you enough distance or fails to make the angle change you want, you could do a whole lot worse than learn how to spey cast.

Take it from the master at RIO, Simon Gawesworth:


Salmon Systems are Out of Balance

From the Anchorage Daily News. Fishing guide Chris Tobias writes about the suffering salmon runs in Alaska. “King salmon returns across much of Alaska are the worst in recent memory, and fishing closures have touched nearly every corner of the state.” Learn more about what's going on in Alaska from this interesting young guide.

https://www.adn.com/opinions/2018/07/19/salmon-systems-are-out-of-balance/

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